$17M victim's settlement fund established from Weinstein Co. bankruptcy

6 months ago 26
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Jan. 26 (UPI) -- A Delaware bankruptcy judge ruled to create a $17 million fund to compensate women who sued convicted Hollywood sex offender Harvey Weinstein after the sale of assets of the Weinstein Company.

Judge Mary Walrath of the U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Wilmington, Del., approved the settlement Monday during a video court hearing over the liquidation of the Weinstein Company, which filed for bankruptcy in 2018 after Weinstein had been accused by multiple women of sexual abuse.

An earlier $19 million victims fund settlement, crafted in part by New York prosecutors in July 2020, was rejected by a New York District Court.

The new victim's fund was part of a class-action settlement to set aside a pool of money for women accusing Weinstein, which also released Weinstein's accusers from confidentiality and non-disclosure agreements.

"We've worked closely with many survivors of Harvey Weinstein who desired a resolution that would provide a safe and confidential process for recovery, and today we're proud to share that the bankruptcy court approved a plan that provides just such a process," Elizabeth Fegan, an attorney representing the class-action plaintiffs, in a statement, reported by the Los Angeles Times.

"Although there will never be enough compensation or redress to right these wrongs, we're immeasurably honored to represent our brave and resilient clients who, in the face of adverse rulings, continued to advocate for a fund for all survivors," she added.

Weinstein is serving a 23-year prison sentence following his conviction on criminal sexual conduct and rape charges in New York City and California.

More than 80 woman have accused Weinstein of sexual abuse or rape since the first accusations. Weinstein's trial and conviction spearheaded the global #MeToo movement, which has since exposed a number of high-profile figures to similar complaints of sexual harassment or misconduct.

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